Highlights

  • The trimechanic theory

    Highlights

    From Galileo Galilei and Robert Hooke in the 17th century to David Julius and Ardem Patapoutian, who won the 2021 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, stiffness and elasticity have been a cornerstone of classical physics and now in biology. To characterize a mechanical role in biology, one task is to quantify the elasticity of a sample. In common terms, the elasticity of a material is characterized by measuring its stiffness, or the resistance of an object to the deformation under an (...)
  • HSP90, a contortionist protein

    Highlights

    HSP90 is a fundamental chaperone protein for many cellular processes. Through its involvement in the folding of many oncoproteins, it is a therapeutic target against cancer. HSP90 is affected by complex structural rearrangements associated with ATP binding and hydrolysis during its functional cycle. However, these structural rearrangements remain poorly described for the apo protein. In this study, researchers from IBS and ILM-Lyon have, for the first time, identified a metastable excited (...)
  • Deep into multivalency: Unravelling molecular mechanism of avidity for rational development of new antivirals

    Highlights

    The C-type lectin receptor DC-SIGN has been highlighted as co-receptor for the spike protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. A multivalent glycomimetic ligand, Polyman26, has been found to inhibit DC-SIGN-dependent trans-infection of SARS-CoV-2. The molecular details underlying avidity generation in such systems remain poorly characterized. In an effort to dissect the contribution of the known multivalent effects - chelation, clustering and statistical rebinding –, researcher of the IBS in Grenoble (...)
  • UvrC needs to open up to repair UV-induced DNA damage

    Highlights

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a conserved and versatile DNA repair pathway found in all domains of life that is responsible for eliminating a wide diversity of DNA lesions from the genome. These include UV-induced pyrimidine dimers, but also bulky adducts caused by smoking or chemotherapeutic agents. In bacteria, NER is initiated by the UvrA and UvrB proteins that together locate the lesion before recruiting a third factor, the dual endonuclease, UvrC, that cleaves the DNA on either (...)
  • Two proteins join forces to make flowers

    Highlights

    What mechanisms are behind the appearance of flowers? To answer this question, a 25-year-old enigma has just been solved: The role of the UFO protein in this formation process. While its nature suggested that it destroys its partners, this protein is in fact an aid to the birth of a flower when it is coupled to the LEAFY protein. This was revealed by researchers from several Grenoble institutes* in a new study published in Nature Plants. Scientists already knew that LEAFY, by binding to (...)
  • Elke De Zitter, winner of the European XFEL Young Scientist Award 2023

    Highlights

    Elke de Zitter (IBS/Dynamics and kinetics of molecular processes Group) has been awarded the European XFEL Young Scientist Award 2023, which aims at recognizing outstanding contributions to research at European XFEL by young researchers in the early stages of their career. This prize rewards De Zitter’s research on processing serial-crystallography data taken by the SPB/SFX instrument at European XFEL. To know (...)
  • ESCRT-III membrane neck cleavage mechanism revealed

    Highlights

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery catalyzes many divergent membrane-remodeling processes such as membrane repair, enveloped virus budding and cytokinesis, amongst others. Dysfunction of the ESCRT machinery is associated with a diverse set of pathologies such as cancer or neuronal deficiencies. Notably members of the ESCRT-III protein family are conserved in all kingdoms of life and have been proposed to polymerize on membranes and remodel them to the (...)
  • A new prodrug activation mechanism

    Highlights

    Prodrugs have little or no pharmacological activity and require modifications to become active. Most prodrugs contain a chemical group that is removed or modified by the body’s enzymes to lead to the active drug, although a few can be intentionally activated by radiation, electrical stimuli or ultrasounds. However, to date, prodrugs capable of self-activation without enzymes or human intervention remain unknown. Researchers from the IBS (Protein Dynamics and Flexibility Group) in (...)